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Miami Music Week

It’s that time of year again! Pool parties, boat parties, 24 hour bangers, and just about everything in between. We’re excited to kick off this week by telling you about our plans, from start to finish. Here’s our 2019 MMW schedule:

  • Monday, March 25th: Strange Bass WMC Edition - Fully diving into the early 90's rave scene & DIY culture, this edition of Strange Bass will feature a variety of genres from some of South Florida's most talented musicians. *

  • Tuesday, March 26th: Onur Ozer, Taimur & Desyn by Un_Mute & The Selectors - After the amazing Detroit Love boat party on Tuesday afternoon of MMW we are heading over to The Electric Pickle to continue with master selectors Onur Ozer, Taimur, and Desyn for whats to be the last conference of the best sounding room in Miami.

  • Wednesday, March 27th: PRISMA Artists MMW Showcase by Link Miami Rebels - Prisma Artists is having their first ever showcase on the globe and they have chosen Floyd Miami to be the birthplace of it all! Their roster is slammed with talented musicians across the electronic spectrum. This lineup they've brewed for Miami shows the firepower this crew has to offer.

  • Thursday, March 28th: Detroit Love feat Carl Craig, Stacey Pullen, and Matthew Dear - After-hours @ The Hangar (2:30-9 AM).

  • Friday, March 29th: Lucid WMC/MMW - 3rd annual Lucid Rave and pajama party presented by Internet Friends, Untitled Miami, and Late for Work. Locals on locals on locals on locals. Villain Theater, 11-4 AM. $5 w/ RSVP, $10 @ door. *

  • Saturday, March 30th: Space Invaders presents Saturday MMW 2019 - Saturday night of MMW Link Miami Rebels will be hosting a massive night, morning, and afternoon where all rooms at Club Space will be open to dance and explore.

  • Sunday, March 31st: MMW 24hr Closing Party - Sunday, March 31st we will be closing off another monster MMW week with our biggest party yet! You do not want to miss this one, the line up is literally unreal!

    For those of you who aren’t interested in exploring the club scene, here’s a list of FREE events throughout MMW: Guide to Free Miami Music Week 2019 Parties.

    Finally, here are a couple events that don’t go into the deep night:

  • Thursday, March 28th: Sunset Sessions with Dave Sol & Friends, 5-10 PM, The Standard. Free w/ RSVP. *

  • Friday, March 29th: Colada Sunrise featuring bbq, spirits, and a bunch of local DJ’s. 10am-7pm, North Shore Open Space Park. FREE! *

We aren’t putting multiple events a day (since there are hundreds) because we, like you, don’t want to be overwhelmed. Take Monday and Tuesday off (if you need it), come Wednesday and we’re going full party mode! Have a great MMW and remember to drink water, eat food, and c’mon: take care of yourself!

Love from the UMAMI Crew.

P.S. Everything with a * does not require ID ;)

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Ultra, Rolling Loud, iii Points: You're all the same.

Yup, we said it. The biggest music festivals in Miami are all, let’s say it again, the same. Genre? Ok, that’s different but we aren’t talking genres, we’re talking big picture. Date? Yes, that’s valid and venues, those are different too. What we’re talking about today is pricing, accessibility, and goal.

Ultra, Rolling Loud, and III Points (2019) ALL have price points over $300. I don’t care where or when you bought the ticket, there’s no way you payed less. To be honest, most of us payed more (if you’re lucky enough to go). To make the math quick, it’s $100 a day. Add drinks, food, weed, and all the extras you’re looking at $150.

We love to say that “we’re rich” in Miami, right? That we can afford anything? Try going to one of these festivals and tell us that you aren’t hurting after. We won’t believe you. No matter how much $150 is to you, $150 is A LOT of money for one day of fun. Yes, you get to see all these great acts that separately would’ve been $50 a pop. We understand that. But, and there’s always a but, these festivals have the ability, first of all, to make it cheaper. On top of that, they’re using the same venue for multiple days (meaning better pricing). You start thinking about that and well, you get upset. Just like we are.

To understand our frustration we have to look back at what makes music (and music festivals) so great. Music festivals started with the idea of bringing people together, plain and simple. It didn’t matter where you came from, what you did, what you were outside of the festival what mattered is that you were there to share a moment with people you knew, love, or if you didn’t know any, to share a moment with everyone (sorry for the run on sentence, we got excited).

From being a public gathering, we’d make the claim that music festivals have gone private. Staying in the 305, Rolling Loud has become the largest hip-hop music festival in the world. This year marks their five year anniversary. What has changed between year one and five? Price. Five years ago at Mana you could get a ticket for $50! Now we’re looking at $400 (with no single day tickets available). Ok, ok. The festival is three days, the names are huge and the venue/times have changed. Cool. I feel you Tariq. Our question remains: Why so expensive? Why aren’t their opportunities for underprivileged individuals to go? Why aren’t their volunteer positions? Internships? Anything?

For us it comes down to accessibility. Music festivals like Ultra, Rolling Loud, and III Points have the ability to change individuals lives. Their power is across all social media outlets, locally and globally. They need to take advantage of what they have, respect the culture of music festivals, and understand, ultimately, what music is. We’re not in the 1990’s in which blacks and whites couldn’t be in the same arena. Today, we have the ability to bring all peoples together and learn, connect, and grow. Our problem with music festivals and the world is something so simple yet complex: Why can’t we be the same? Why do certain people get to experience things others can’t? And, finally, why can’t we help each other, at least locally, grow?

UMAMI’s here to bring back the reason music festivals began. Woodstock and Monterey Pop Festival, to name a few, started a legacy of what we now know as “music festivals”. We aren’t bringing back Woodstock, it’s the mantra that we’re looking for. It’s not about the money (to a certain extent), it’s not about materialism, it’s about bringing people together for the love of music, plain and simple.

* We have to say that we’re lucky enough to attend all three festivals and support the culture to the most. Yes, all three can improve but so can we! We all can. *

* We have to say that we’re lucky enough to attend all three festivals and support the culture to the most. Yes, all three can improve but so can we! We all can. *

What's up, UMAMI?

What’s down? The earth. We can get specific and say crust, mantle, and core but who gives a shit about science? We don't.

We’re here writing at 11 PM because we feel, fuck it, I feel that we aren’t giving you the content you deserve. As an audience, you deserve consistent events, blogs, playlists, promos, giveaways and so much more. To be honest, we haven’t delivered. How can we make you UMAMI for life?

It starts with events, something we’re working on 24/7. From there, we’re tackling the rest. As an audience, why the fuck would you care about what we’re up to? Because you love Miami and its art scene just as much as we do (and if you don’t, we still love you for supporting).

So here it is: What we’re up to….

Social Media: Even though we haven’t been active, we’re working on a social media campaign that’ll blow your socks off. Literally.

Contracts: We’re in the process of securing our first venue of 2019. Exciting for you and me both.

Emails, DM’s, just about everything else: I bet you we answer faster then Ultra.

The boring stuff: Calling, planning, searching, finding, contacting, just about everything ending in an “ing”.

All in four bullet points?!? It must sound easier than it is. Even though it probably isn’t the first time you’ve heard it, organizing events from beginning to end isn’t like rolling a joint, it’s more like those 3 legged joints (you know, the one’s that look like a cross). We appreciate you for sticking with us throughout this time and as we grow, the growing pains’ll get easier. For now, ya’ll do your job and sit back, watch, and enjoy our ride.

P.S. As founder and creative director I want to make it clear that we’re doing this for the love, not the money. Recently we’ve had a bunch of people asking about the next event, how we’ll be paying for it, etc. All I can say is this: We’re working on it. All of our events (so far) have been put together without any form of outside funding. Does that make us crazy? Yes it fucking does. But what is also does is show just how much we, and I, care about the 305.

The 2 Live Crew

We said it was the last blog of 2018 but you know what, we lied. After scrolling through all the social media’s, we got inspired. The place we ended up? Miami Bass, also known as booty music.

If ya’ll know anything about Miami’s music history you know about Miami Bass. It started in the 80’s with producers and hip-hop artists alike, searching for a “real” 305 sound. The story goes something like this:

It was 1985 when Miami based producer Amos Larkins II discovered the TR Roland 808. While he was mastering the track that would become the first ever Miami bass track, ‘Bass Rock Express’ by MC ADE, he was having a little fun (well, if you’re into drugs and strippers, a lot of fun) that distracted him just enough to make a brilliant mistake.

After partying in a local strip club - the party location of choice in Miami before South Beach became what it is today - downing a lot of liquor, smoking some weed, and doing a bunch of coke, he felt loose enough to go to the studio and do the final engineering on the track before sending it off to press. In fact, he felt so loose that he decided to bring one of the strippers with him; A decision that would obviously lead to a distracted effort but inadvertently lead to genius.

Working on the bassline with the volume lower than usual so he could focus on the sex and drugs, he recorded a track that he would have never sent off otherwise. When he heard the final product at his friends mixtape store he freaked out. In an interview with the Miami New Times, he told them how the bass “was hittin' hard and fucked up and out of phase and it was all over-compressed and shit” even noting that it was “was humming like bass from hell”.

He probably would have had a cocaine/stress induced heart attack had he not immediately been relieved by the fact that the whole store was grooving to the track -- and they weren’t the only ones. He left the store and heard it bumping from the speakers of a car that was slowly driving by in the parking lot. He was shocked. Waiving them down, he asked if they were into the song and its new sound and they basically said “Hell yeah!”.

That brings us to 2 live crew, one of the most (or the most) influential hip-hop groups reigning from the east coast. They took the Miami Bass to a whole new level, adding dirty lyrics to the already dirty beats. Let us remind you that this was the 80’s. Marvin Gaye’s “Sexual Healing” was already considered a provocative tune, what do you think the country thought of 2 live crew’s “Throw the D”? Yup, you guessed it, the old guys didn’t like it.

2 live crew, including the “pack leader” Luther Campbell, were summoned to the US Supreme Court. Faced with a monumental decision to stop making music or fight the oldies, they decided to fight the oldies (good decision). As always, the oldies lost, not getting their wish to ban 2 live’s music. From then on (and still today), they paved the way for musicians everywhere to embrace their raunchy side.

Thanks to the boys, your favorite rappers can say all the fucks and motherfuckers and bitches and assholes they can think of. Censorship can suck our dick and the oldies can too. Thanks for letting us share a little history and we’ll see you next year. For real this time ;)

BALANCE

Hey fam!!

Hope you’ve all had a great week. As a salute to the winter break and holidays, this is our last blog of 2018. By Monday, our newsletter subscribers can expect a little love in their inbox and next week we’ll be on vacation, sharing a playlist that you don’t want to miss.

To take us into the new year, we want to talk about something close to our hearts. We decided that rather than summarize our year and what’s coming next (even though we’re about to), we should talk about something we’ve learned throughout this process. For those who want the visual summary of 2018 (visual is best), go check out the CONNECT and VENTURE after movie! Both are on our Youtube channel “UMAMI”.

CONNECT and VENTURE 2018 taught us a lot. CONNECT was a total success in terms of turnout. We struggled with having performers on time but overall, we felt as if it was a job well done. VENTURE brought us better management, organization, but lacked the crowd we needed. In both, we felt as if ALL attendees (besides the ones standing outside complaining about paying) had a great time. That makes us happy.

What we’ve learned most through working hard, being with creatives and all walks of life is balance. Balance in the professional sense, personal and in general, life sense. We can’t tell you how to live your life but we can help. At least we both agree on a couple things, we live in Miami and we aren’t going anywhere.

Living in Miami has its challenges. We face some crazy motherfuckas no matter where you look. Seriously, Miami isn’t an easy place to live. For us, it’s a daily struggle to go “out” or not. Another struggle? Where to go for dinner.

BALANCE has made, at least for us, Miami a lot easier to handle. In our daily lives, we have priorities. Girlfriend/boyfriend is up there, work, school, food, the list goes on and on. For each individual, our priorities remain different. Understanding and knowing this is key to finding BALANCE. And here it comes: UMAMI, what in the fuck do you mean? Chill fammm we getting there!!

Priorities are what gives us an organic schedule. Yes, I know you don’t need a schedule because they’re overrated. Fair point. Shedules are made to keep our lives somewhat in check. Without time, just like a schedule, the world wouldn't know what to do next. For example, if you didn't know what time it is how would you know when to have dinner? Ummmm when the sun goes down? It works, we guess, but it isn’t the best form of living.

At UMAMI, we want the best. Best of musicians, artists, and creatives in Miami and the surrounding neighborhood. To live the best life, we believe in organic schedules, in other words, priorities. Of course, having a paper schedule makes remembering everything a whole lot easier but we don’t need to get that extreme. We want you to start with understanding your priority and a happy life. Not as an individual in society, as YOU.

For example, our priorities circle around organizing the best local events possible in order to improve upon the art, music, and cultural scene in Miami, eventually going abroad. I’ll be the first to tell you that this takes a long time. It’s more than a 9-5 job, its a 24/7 one. In such a demanding environment (especially in Miami), we found three things we rely on to keep us sane. To keep me me and not another, nasty version of me I work out, make sure to chill before dinner and DJ. Sounds cheesy but it’s true, we out here trying to be balanced.

Have a great winter break and enjoy the holidaze with family and friends. Our New Years resolution is to bring events to you next year that’ll make your mind rattle, head shake and hips move uncontrollably. Stay safe, eat a hell of a lotta food and remember, stay balanced.

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Soundcloud Gen.

Happy hump day! With Thanksgiving right around the corner, we’re spending today analyzing what we’re thankful for. Besides family, friends, and the basics, we’re thankful for your support! Yes, we know we’ve said it before but fuck it, WE REALLY ADORE YOU GUYS. Organizations, or any company for that matter, can’t function without people supporting a common goal. We’re way too thankful for your support (although, are you ever too thankful?).

Sentimental notes aside, we’re excited for the weekend. Friday is Dylan Hall’s E.P. Release Party and the long weekend is just what we need to get ready for Basel. If you haven’t heard, we’ve been busy planning a pop-up that hit a little bump in the road. Plowing forward, we hope to bring you a “Locals Only” pop-up for Basel 2018. More info on Dylan Hall’s E.P. Release Party under “tickets” and we’ll keep you updated through our socials for Basel.

Dylan, as well as many rappers, let’s say musicians to keep it general, started with nothing. Ok, maybe they had enough money to get a couple speakers, maybe a mic to record a song or two, but for the most, including us, we had to make something out of nothing. The first step to doing so is determination and motivation. Determination to get somewhere, motivation to do something about it.

Once any artist has an innate feeling to create for whatever reason they think makes it worth it (in other word determined and motivated), we move on to having a platform to express themselves. Take a second to think about it: ANY artist, whether it’s in music, writing, dance, acting, etc. starts with a feeling, with a need to do that art form. If your parents have money, you get to go to arts school. If they don’t, your stuck with nothing other than the internet.

Platform, platform, platform. UMAMI, why did you start? Because we wanted to create a performing platform for local artists and the youth. Soundcloud, why did you start? Because we wanted to create a platform that enables anyone to upload, record, promote, and share originally created sounds across the web. Platform is immensely important to all artists, Soundcloud is specifically important to musicians.

Soundcloud was founded in 2007 by Alexander Ljung. iTunes was founded in 2001, Youtube in 2005, and Spotify in 2008. Today, these platforms are the largest music streaming platforms in the world (sorry Band camp). All are widely used for uploading anything from music to music videos and lyrics, but only two specialize in free, un-restricted uploading: Youtube and Soundcloud.

Back to Dylan and artists without much but a passion for their art, creating music videos for Youtube is expensive. iTunes and Spotify make the process difficult. We’re left with Soundcloud, and we just explained the whole reason behind the Soundcloud Gen., got it?

Fine fine fine, let’s dig a little deeper. Artists aren’t interested in paying to upload their music. If anything, they want money for their streams (which they should)! Like not wanting to pay for uploads, they don’t want to wait all day to get their song up (who does?). Soundcloud swooped in to fill the void. With Soundcloud, any artist at any level could finally, and quickly, upload their music and get feedback immediately. C’mon, you know what we’re talking about. Go to our Soundcloud and check out any of our playlists. Go ahead, test that comment section!

Soundcloud came and hasn’t stopped. Recently, Soundcloud has grown enormously due to the influx of “wanna be rappers”. Dylan isn’t a wanna be, a lot of artists on Soundcloud aren’t, but the fact is that with such an easy platform to access and upload, people who shouldn’t be rapping are. Wait Wait Wait. Just Wait. We aren’t in the position to judge musical abilities but we are. Why? Because we have enough experience in the music industry that we can tell what has potential and what doesn’t. Obviously, we can be wrong, but the trend is increasingly growing…. Everyone wants to rap/produce. Fuck, we wanted to before we saw the market.

As the social trend to rap increases, which in our opinion isn’t a bad thing, comes the Soundcloud Generation (Soundcloud Gen). Juice Wrld, Dexter, Ski Mask, XXX, basically the whole “new” South Florida rap game comes from Soundcloud. There is amazing talent on Soundcloud and some not so amazing ones too. Cole Bennet, owner of Lyrical Lemonade and videographer for some of the biggest music videos in the music industry today, started with filming “Soundcloud rappers”. His ideal is similar to ours: The Soundcloud Gen is on top now, what will be the next big thing?

  • Side note: This blog is to understand the Soundcloud Gen, why it began, and whether Soundcloud will remain the platform for start-up musicians. We encourage ALL artists and musicians to start or continue uploading their work on Soundcloud and other streaming platforms (if feasible). If you have a dream and a passion for music, do it! You have nothing to loose.

Issa Joke. - 21 Savage

Issa Joke. - 21 Savage