Filtering by Tag: art

Miami Music Week

It’s that time of year again! Pool parties, boat parties, 24 hour bangers, and just about everything in between. We’re excited to kick off this week by telling you about our plans, from start to finish. Here’s our 2019 MMW schedule:

  • Monday, March 25th: Strange Bass WMC Edition - Fully diving into the early 90's rave scene & DIY culture, this edition of Strange Bass will feature a variety of genres from some of South Florida's most talented musicians. *

  • Tuesday, March 26th: Onur Ozer, Taimur & Desyn by Un_Mute & The Selectors - After the amazing Detroit Love boat party on Tuesday afternoon of MMW we are heading over to The Electric Pickle to continue with master selectors Onur Ozer, Taimur, and Desyn for whats to be the last conference of the best sounding room in Miami.

  • Wednesday, March 27th: PRISMA Artists MMW Showcase by Link Miami Rebels - Prisma Artists is having their first ever showcase on the globe and they have chosen Floyd Miami to be the birthplace of it all! Their roster is slammed with talented musicians across the electronic spectrum. This lineup they've brewed for Miami shows the firepower this crew has to offer.

  • Thursday, March 28th: Detroit Love feat Carl Craig, Stacey Pullen, and Matthew Dear - After-hours @ The Hangar (2:30-9 AM).

  • Friday, March 29th: Lucid WMC/MMW - 3rd annual Lucid Rave and pajama party presented by Internet Friends, Untitled Miami, and Late for Work. Locals on locals on locals on locals. Villain Theater, 11-4 AM. $5 w/ RSVP, $10 @ door. *

  • Saturday, March 30th: Space Invaders presents Saturday MMW 2019 - Saturday night of MMW Link Miami Rebels will be hosting a massive night, morning, and afternoon where all rooms at Club Space will be open to dance and explore.

  • Sunday, March 31st: MMW 24hr Closing Party - Sunday, March 31st we will be closing off another monster MMW week with our biggest party yet! You do not want to miss this one, the line up is literally unreal!

    For those of you who aren’t interested in exploring the club scene, here’s a list of FREE events throughout MMW: Guide to Free Miami Music Week 2019 Parties.

    Finally, here are a couple events that don’t go into the deep night:

  • Thursday, March 28th: Sunset Sessions with Dave Sol & Friends, 5-10 PM, The Standard. Free w/ RSVP. *

  • Friday, March 29th: Colada Sunrise featuring bbq, spirits, and a bunch of local DJ’s. 10am-7pm, North Shore Open Space Park. FREE! *

We aren’t putting multiple events a day (since there are hundreds) because we, like you, don’t want to be overwhelmed. Take Monday and Tuesday off (if you need it), come Wednesday and we’re going full party mode! Have a great MMW and remember to drink water, eat food, and c’mon: take care of yourself!

Love from the UMAMI Crew.

P.S. Everything with a * does not require ID ;)

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III POINTS, WE LOVE YOU

Hey fam! Happy February. It’s weird to say that we’ve been busy but what can we say? We always are. Today marks the day that we’re on another grind: get these fucking events going! Why? Well we’ve been held back by venue owners, speaker rentals, partners, and all that stuff ya’ll don’t need to worry about. What we all need to worry about is iii Points, not only an inspiring festival full of creative and most importantly, local people, but a festival that this year, did it all.

We were lucky enough to attend all 3 days of 3 points (see what we did there). Friday’s headliner was Tyler, Saturday Beach House and Herbie Hancock, Sunday was full of legends: Erykah Badu, Egyptian Lover, A$AP Rocky, Danny Daze, David August, DJ Koze, lets stop there before we take up a whole page. It was a musical masterpiece to say the least. Our experience, which is what we want (and can talk about), is heaven (if there is one, of course).

The day before iii Points was a stressful one for one main reason: weed. We needed it. Once we settled that we focused on our schedule, made conveniently using the iii Points app. Just for reference, the two essentials to iii Points are weed and schedule. The rest’ll be history.

Moving forward to something more educational, our first day (and last) were an absolute blast. We posted our full schedule on IG for Friday. Mostly house and techno music, we focused on the isotropic and boiler room stage. The main stage, called Mind Melt, was shaking with Tyler and a special appearance from the man himself, A$AP motherfucking Rocky. Crazy. That’s that.

Saturday and Sunday were a lot of the same. House, techno, house, hip-hop, bands and to add to the mosh posh: Valentine’s Day weekend. iii Points, in its decor and music, made love a vocal point. For crying out loud, we left Herbie early to go to Masego. If you weren’t at his set and you didn’t feel the love, well, you had to. It was really a joy and eye-opener.

Summaries sound boring. All in all, boring. In conclusion, yawn. Let’s go with “a heavenly weekend”. From music choice to stage design, sound, lighting, vendors, merchandise, venue, and even security, we can safely say iii Points did an amazing job. If you’re convinced on going to iii Points already, you can stop here. You have the 2020 vision that Ms. Badu (and the poet who introduced her) stated. For those of you who need more info, details, a little kick in the ass to get to Mana next year, here’s our breakdown on what they did well, how they did things different, and why iii Points is different than anything else.

  • Music: We read an article in which co-founder David Sinopoli said “we want 50% local, 50% big names”. He explained the idea behind it: Put someone on stage who brings a large crowd (meaning big name) right before or after a local act. By doing so, you're attracting a larger audience, most who’ve never heard the local act, to interact and listen to locals. Genius. Line-up was on point by the way.

  • Stage: iii Points 2019 had a couple of major revamps: different date and a lot more stages. Six stages made up the festival this year spanning all of Mana Wynwood. Isotropic was our favorite with Door IV being the lesser of the great. Our opinion: keep making stages original and stop being modern. We don’t want the black stages with curtains, we want something new and creative. Just like iii Points is.

  • Vendors: Throughout the festival there were art instillations, food vendors, clothes, bars, buses, and even a little market called Little Spati. A little birdy told us the food was programmed by someone different this year. Even though we don’t know who it is, job well done. The food was delicious. Clothing stand and the extras were cool, but our eyes were set on the weed maps bus. Not only a dope idea, but a useful one.

  • Merch: Cool. Very cool. Wanted to buy a long sleeve but they closed before we could make it. Made us think of a system that attendees should be able to buy before and pick up later. That way we can all party and deal with business in the morning.

  • Venue and Vibe: The two v’s go together, don’t they? Mana Wynwood is conveniently located and has been/still is the perfect place for iii Points. Storage containers, wooden structures, lights, and a disco ball only made Mana shine “brighter than a diamond”.

  • Security: We know you guys don’t really care about security but you’ll care about this, iii Points doesn’t give a shit about weed. Put it in your pocket gentlemen, you don’t have to tuck and go for this one.

A festival comes down to being together with people, listening to amazing music, and having a memorable time. We can say that iii Points needs to work on having less technical difficulties, time management skills, and nitpick points of improvement but, for this festival, it isn’t worth it. All the artists showed up, nothing really went wrong, and everyone had a great time. iii Points, we have the 2020 vision, we love you, and can’t wait to be doing what your doing <3

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Ultra, Rolling Loud, iii Points: You're all the same.

Yup, we said it. The biggest music festivals in Miami are all, let’s say it again, the same. Genre? Ok, that’s different but we aren’t talking genres, we’re talking big picture. Date? Yes, that’s valid and venues, those are different too. What we’re talking about today is pricing, accessibility, and goal.

Ultra, Rolling Loud, and III Points (2019) ALL have price points over $300. I don’t care where or when you bought the ticket, there’s no way you payed less. To be honest, most of us payed more (if you’re lucky enough to go). To make the math quick, it’s $100 a day. Add drinks, food, weed, and all the extras you’re looking at $150.

We love to say that “we’re rich” in Miami, right? That we can afford anything? Try going to one of these festivals and tell us that you aren’t hurting after. We won’t believe you. No matter how much $150 is to you, $150 is A LOT of money for one day of fun. Yes, you get to see all these great acts that separately would’ve been $50 a pop. We understand that. But, and there’s always a but, these festivals have the ability, first of all, to make it cheaper. On top of that, they’re using the same venue for multiple days (meaning better pricing). You start thinking about that and well, you get upset. Just like we are.

To understand our frustration we have to look back at what makes music (and music festivals) so great. Music festivals started with the idea of bringing people together, plain and simple. It didn’t matter where you came from, what you did, what you were outside of the festival what mattered is that you were there to share a moment with people you knew, love, or if you didn’t know any, to share a moment with everyone (sorry for the run on sentence, we got excited).

From being a public gathering, we’d make the claim that music festivals have gone private. Staying in the 305, Rolling Loud has become the largest hip-hop music festival in the world. This year marks their five year anniversary. What has changed between year one and five? Price. Five years ago at Mana you could get a ticket for $50! Now we’re looking at $400 (with no single day tickets available). Ok, ok. The festival is three days, the names are huge and the venue/times have changed. Cool. I feel you Tariq. Our question remains: Why so expensive? Why aren’t their opportunities for underprivileged individuals to go? Why aren’t their volunteer positions? Internships? Anything?

For us it comes down to accessibility. Music festivals like Ultra, Rolling Loud, and III Points have the ability to change individuals lives. Their power is across all social media outlets, locally and globally. They need to take advantage of what they have, respect the culture of music festivals, and understand, ultimately, what music is. We’re not in the 1990’s in which blacks and whites couldn’t be in the same arena. Today, we have the ability to bring all peoples together and learn, connect, and grow. Our problem with music festivals and the world is something so simple yet complex: Why can’t we be the same? Why do certain people get to experience things others can’t? And, finally, why can’t we help each other, at least locally, grow?

UMAMI’s here to bring back the reason music festivals began. Woodstock and Monterey Pop Festival, to name a few, started a legacy of what we now know as “music festivals”. We aren’t bringing back Woodstock, it’s the mantra that we’re looking for. It’s not about the money (to a certain extent), it’s not about materialism, it’s about bringing people together for the love of music, plain and simple.

* We have to say that we’re lucky enough to attend all three festivals and support the culture to the most. Yes, all three can improve but so can we! We all can. *

* We have to say that we’re lucky enough to attend all three festivals and support the culture to the most. Yes, all three can improve but so can we! We all can. *

What's up, UMAMI?

What’s down? The earth. We can get specific and say crust, mantle, and core but who gives a shit about science? We don't.

We’re here writing at 11 PM because we feel, fuck it, I feel that we aren’t giving you the content you deserve. As an audience, you deserve consistent events, blogs, playlists, promos, giveaways and so much more. To be honest, we haven’t delivered. How can we make you UMAMI for life?

It starts with events, something we’re working on 24/7. From there, we’re tackling the rest. As an audience, why the fuck would you care about what we’re up to? Because you love Miami and its art scene just as much as we do (and if you don’t, we still love you for supporting).

So here it is: What we’re up to….

Social Media: Even though we haven’t been active, we’re working on a social media campaign that’ll blow your socks off. Literally.

Contracts: We’re in the process of securing our first venue of 2019. Exciting for you and me both.

Emails, DM’s, just about everything else: I bet you we answer faster then Ultra.

The boring stuff: Calling, planning, searching, finding, contacting, just about everything ending in an “ing”.

All in four bullet points?!? It must sound easier than it is. Even though it probably isn’t the first time you’ve heard it, organizing events from beginning to end isn’t like rolling a joint, it’s more like those 3 legged joints (you know, the one’s that look like a cross). We appreciate you for sticking with us throughout this time and as we grow, the growing pains’ll get easier. For now, ya’ll do your job and sit back, watch, and enjoy our ride.

P.S. As founder and creative director I want to make it clear that we’re doing this for the love, not the money. Recently we’ve had a bunch of people asking about the next event, how we’ll be paying for it, etc. All I can say is this: We’re working on it. All of our events (so far) have been put together without any form of outside funding. Does that make us crazy? Yes it fucking does. But what is also does is show just how much we, and I, care about the 305.

The 2 Live Crew

We said it was the last blog of 2018 but you know what, we lied. After scrolling through all the social media’s, we got inspired. The place we ended up? Miami Bass, also known as booty music.

If ya’ll know anything about Miami’s music history you know about Miami Bass. It started in the 80’s with producers and hip-hop artists alike, searching for a “real” 305 sound. The story goes something like this:

It was 1985 when Miami based producer Amos Larkins II discovered the TR Roland 808. While he was mastering the track that would become the first ever Miami bass track, ‘Bass Rock Express’ by MC ADE, he was having a little fun (well, if you’re into drugs and strippers, a lot of fun) that distracted him just enough to make a brilliant mistake.

After partying in a local strip club - the party location of choice in Miami before South Beach became what it is today - downing a lot of liquor, smoking some weed, and doing a bunch of coke, he felt loose enough to go to the studio and do the final engineering on the track before sending it off to press. In fact, he felt so loose that he decided to bring one of the strippers with him; A decision that would obviously lead to a distracted effort but inadvertently lead to genius.

Working on the bassline with the volume lower than usual so he could focus on the sex and drugs, he recorded a track that he would have never sent off otherwise. When he heard the final product at his friends mixtape store he freaked out. In an interview with the Miami New Times, he told them how the bass “was hittin' hard and fucked up and out of phase and it was all over-compressed and shit” even noting that it was “was humming like bass from hell”.

He probably would have had a cocaine/stress induced heart attack had he not immediately been relieved by the fact that the whole store was grooving to the track -- and they weren’t the only ones. He left the store and heard it bumping from the speakers of a car that was slowly driving by in the parking lot. He was shocked. Waiving them down, he asked if they were into the song and its new sound and they basically said “Hell yeah!”.

That brings us to 2 live crew, one of the most (or the most) influential hip-hop groups reigning from the east coast. They took the Miami Bass to a whole new level, adding dirty lyrics to the already dirty beats. Let us remind you that this was the 80’s. Marvin Gaye’s “Sexual Healing” was already considered a provocative tune, what do you think the country thought of 2 live crew’s “Throw the D”? Yup, you guessed it, the old guys didn’t like it.

2 live crew, including the “pack leader” Luther Campbell, were summoned to the US Supreme Court. Faced with a monumental decision to stop making music or fight the oldies, they decided to fight the oldies (good decision). As always, the oldies lost, not getting their wish to ban 2 live’s music. From then on (and still today), they paved the way for musicians everywhere to embrace their raunchy side.

Thanks to the boys, your favorite rappers can say all the fucks and motherfuckers and bitches and assholes they can think of. Censorship can suck our dick and the oldies can too. Thanks for letting us share a little history and we’ll see you next year. For real this time ;)

BALANCE

Hey fam!!

Hope you’ve all had a great week. As a salute to the winter break and holidays, this is our last blog of 2018. By Monday, our newsletter subscribers can expect a little love in their inbox and next week we’ll be on vacation, sharing a playlist that you don’t want to miss.

To take us into the new year, we want to talk about something close to our hearts. We decided that rather than summarize our year and what’s coming next (even though we’re about to), we should talk about something we’ve learned throughout this process. For those who want the visual summary of 2018 (visual is best), go check out the CONNECT and VENTURE after movie! Both are on our Youtube channel “UMAMI”.

CONNECT and VENTURE 2018 taught us a lot. CONNECT was a total success in terms of turnout. We struggled with having performers on time but overall, we felt as if it was a job well done. VENTURE brought us better management, organization, but lacked the crowd we needed. In both, we felt as if ALL attendees (besides the ones standing outside complaining about paying) had a great time. That makes us happy.

What we’ve learned most through working hard, being with creatives and all walks of life is balance. Balance in the professional sense, personal and in general, life sense. We can’t tell you how to live your life but we can help. At least we both agree on a couple things, we live in Miami and we aren’t going anywhere.

Living in Miami has its challenges. We face some crazy motherfuckas no matter where you look. Seriously, Miami isn’t an easy place to live. For us, it’s a daily struggle to go “out” or not. Another struggle? Where to go for dinner.

BALANCE has made, at least for us, Miami a lot easier to handle. In our daily lives, we have priorities. Girlfriend/boyfriend is up there, work, school, food, the list goes on and on. For each individual, our priorities remain different. Understanding and knowing this is key to finding BALANCE. And here it comes: UMAMI, what in the fuck do you mean? Chill fammm we getting there!!

Priorities are what gives us an organic schedule. Yes, I know you don’t need a schedule because they’re overrated. Fair point. Shedules are made to keep our lives somewhat in check. Without time, just like a schedule, the world wouldn't know what to do next. For example, if you didn't know what time it is how would you know when to have dinner? Ummmm when the sun goes down? It works, we guess, but it isn’t the best form of living.

At UMAMI, we want the best. Best of musicians, artists, and creatives in Miami and the surrounding neighborhood. To live the best life, we believe in organic schedules, in other words, priorities. Of course, having a paper schedule makes remembering everything a whole lot easier but we don’t need to get that extreme. We want you to start with understanding your priority and a happy life. Not as an individual in society, as YOU.

For example, our priorities circle around organizing the best local events possible in order to improve upon the art, music, and cultural scene in Miami, eventually going abroad. I’ll be the first to tell you that this takes a long time. It’s more than a 9-5 job, its a 24/7 one. In such a demanding environment (especially in Miami), we found three things we rely on to keep us sane. To keep me me and not another, nasty version of me I work out, make sure to chill before dinner and DJ. Sounds cheesy but it’s true, we out here trying to be balanced.

Have a great winter break and enjoy the holidaze with family and friends. Our New Years resolution is to bring events to you next year that’ll make your mind rattle, head shake and hips move uncontrollably. Stay safe, eat a hell of a lotta food and remember, stay balanced.

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Bansky and Basel

Basel is over, traffic died down, and the weather got cold. We guess it’s time to stay in and write a blog. Forget the guess, we know. It’s time to reflect on the craziness of Basel, looking at one person in particular: Banksy.

If you looked at our Basel plans, we were packed. I mean REALLY busy. By the time Rakastella finished, we could barely walk! Sunday we made it to a couple galleries before hibernating Monday. No excuse for not writing about Basel already, just explaining why we might sound a little slow this morning.

Even though we missed the Banksy exhibit (c’mon we can’t do everything), we’re familiar with Banksy and his work. Our IG post over the weekend made quite a statement. We told ya’ll to not attend the Banksy exhibit. Why? Because he didn’t authorize it. He’s not making money off it and the exhibit is produced by his former artistic director, not his current one. Wanna know who his current artistic director is? Himself.

For those of you who don’t know much about Banksy, we’ll give you a little insight. Banksy is an English-based street artist. No one knows his name or what he looks like (Lowkey people do, they keep it on the DL). His name has gained a huge amount of recognition due to his political as well as social values. Through art, mainly graffiti, he tells a story about his opinionated views on police and government, challenging society to think outside of the box.

Banksy is far from the average graffiti artist. He goes above and beyond to prove his point. One time, he printed fake money which was used by hundreds in shops around England. Another time, he destroyed his own work of art. In both situations, he faced a challenge. His opinion vs. the norm. Now, and during Basel in particular, he faces the same challenge, his art vs. the world.

In Banksy’s eyes, art should be seen by everyone. There shouldn’t be fees to see artwork and people shouldn’t buy street art (which is meant for the street). Its a very good point. You wanna know why? Fine, fine. We think that the artist has the decision in 1.) how they want their art portrayed and 2.) how the art effects the world. Art in galleries is seen by less than it being on the street. No matter what you say, it’s the truth. Throughout a day, more people walk by a busy street than pay money to go to an art gallery. Banksy is intent on spreading his message through art and therefore, it should be displayed the way he wants it to, on the street.

Private collectors put together a collection of art Banksy didn’t approve of. I mean, it’s his, so of course he loves it. He doesn’t love the way it’s displayed and due to it’s display, the way it’s perceived. We thought this was a good way to end the Basel season and start the Netflix and Chill. Reflect on Basel and what it does for artists. On one hand its great, it brings the spotlight to creatives who otherwise might’ve not had it. On the other, it hurts artists that don’t want to be displayed that way. Remember that artists don’t need to put together a showcase, anyone who has enough art can. We can’t wait to have our own Basel next year and show Miami the right way to showcase art. Hella love for Basel but we’re happy it’s over. Time to get ready for the holidays.

Talk soon

BASEL 2018: Part 3

There’s too much to cover so here’s your intro: The lucky 3, our final part of Basel.

What, Why and When: Part 1 and 2 of our blog covered the bases. We tackled Basel’s brief history and our schedule, along with the usual extras. Today we’re taking the extras a step further.

Basel unofficially began yesterday. Half Full Creative along with In Good Company began their week of events known as “Decompress”, the boys INVT have been spinning left and right and the city is obviously getting ready for the people. Today, also known as Monday, also known as Hump Day, isn’t crazy. Porches live at Kindred Miami along with the usual “Rockwell Mondaze”. Tuesday (tomorrow) is the time to rest for Wednesday, the day locals are beginning Basel (c’mon you know we keep it unofficial).

Wednesday, December 5th: We didn’t include Wednesday for a reason. It’s not because we want to make your life difficult, it’s because we wanted to make it easy. It’s a busy time of year and our instincts told us to start Basel Thursday. Then we remembered were Miamians and if it’s one thing we’re good at, its staying up late and being at work early in the morning.

Our plans for Wednesday start in Wynwood, Mana to be specific. Throughout the day (and till the end of Basel), Mana is hosting multiple collaborations, instillations and projects by local and global artists. “Wednesday at 777 International Mall”, Juxtapoz Clubhouse in Downtown and multiple events throughout the day and night. We’ll do some strolling, check out some live artists and if bored, head over to CONTEXT Art Miami, located at the Herald Plaza. It’s against our principles to enter one of those giant tents but we like their ideal: create a meaningful dialogue between artists, galleries, and collectors. Wednesday night ends (and’ll probably go into Thursday) with the RAW Pop-Up, an abandoned department store coming to life. Tickets can be found here.

Thursday-Sunday we already covered in Part 2. One event we didn’t talk about is Powerhouse, presented by the Art Plug. For one it’s 21+. It’s also in direct conflict with our schedule. We’ll be the first to say that if there’s any spare time between JuiceWrld, Galaxia, Rakastella, and everything else, we’re at Powerhouse.

Timeout wrote it best so we don’t have to. Here’s what author Virgina Gil said, “Brace for another immersive art experience this Basel—one that’s built for adults and probably NSFW (some parts of it at least). The Art Plug Power House spans several blocks, where you’ll encounter a High Hemp Smoke + Mirrors installation plus more than 30 interactive activations, monster truck and motorbike shows, the Art Plug + Monsieur Marcel collab pop-up and an exhibition by Marcel Katz Art. More than 20 artists are expected to participate in this abandoned impound-turned-gallery. 1440 NW 21St” Sounds absolutely fucking crazy, right? We love it. Powerhouse goes from Friday-Saturday and starts at 8 PM each day. Tickets can be found here.

Still eager to know about more galleries, events, etc. for Basel 2018? Here’s a couple links to great guides for locals:

And finally, we thank you for reading and (hopefully) taking a couple of our suggestions. Enjoy the Basel season, don’t stress out to see everything, and enjoy the locals, not the tourists. Remember, Basel is just as important for local creatives as it is for everyone else. It’s a chance for all to shine, have a platform that’s well seen and for some, a stepping stone into the global art scene. Let’s not take it for granted, Miami.

#BLESSEDTOLIVEINTHE305

BASEL 2018: Part 2

This is the one you don’t want to miss: Our recommendations and guidance to Art Basel 2018. With over 100 events throughout the weekend (and more), it’s a hard choice. Locals is a must, great events are almost as important, and the main deciding factor? Newness (no, it’s not a word). New not in the sense that it’s a first time event, new in the way that it’s breaking boundaries, doing creative events with a purpose. Let’s get into it before we all get blue balls.

Thursday, December 6th: The first day of mayhem. We’re starting it off with Brandon Breaux, creative director to the lyrical genius “Chance the Rapper”. He’ll be at Half Full Creative presenting “Mental Health is Real” from 6-10 PM (Thursday and Friday). You can RSVP here. Right after the realness, we’re going to get weird with Flying Lotus and Virgil, both at RC Cola Plant. Tickets are still on sale here.

Friday, December 7th: Today we’re starting early. Couple of local galleries in the morning (listed below), lunch at Zak the Baker and we’re heading to “Juice in Colors” presented by Cushy Gigs. The event is free and open to the public (address can be found by looking up Cushy Gigs). Our favorite orange Atomiko and others will be there. Next, we’re keeping the juice vibes to head over to JuiceWrld, presented in part by Blnk Cnvs. Tickets can be found here.

Saturday, December 8th: Getting tired yet? So are we. Morning is a little relaxation followed by the good ol’ cup of Joe. Afternoon we’re busy setting up for Galaxia, presented by Thriftylion Festivals. UMAMI crew will be in the building lending our hand, local artists will be representing Miami during Basel and the vibes will be “out of this world”. C’mon, you have to like what we did there! Tickets can be found here.

That isn’t it. After Galaxia (it only ends at 2 AM), we’re headed to Rakastella! Amazing DJ’s, great views, and the place to be to take us into Sunday.

Sunday, December 9th: Waking up with a headache, tired from the people, and too cool to go to another Basel money pit. We call this the Basel Hangover. What to do? Suck it up and Basel till tomorrow! It’s only one more day….

The last day of our Basel will be DJ heavy, to say the least. “Where are my keys” starts from 7 AM-midnight with a line-up that seems hard to miss. Martinez Brothers and Peggy Gou at Space to take it into Monday. Fuck us, this is quite the feat.

This is what we’ll be doing for Basel, what about you (BLOW UP THE FUCKING COMMENTS) !?! Be back tomorrow with an array of local galleries, more events, and a little insider for those scratching for an UMAMI event.

P.S. In no way are these the events that you should go to. We’re simply offering suggestions based on what we’ve heard, what we want to see, and the things we think you’ll find interesting. Feel free to go to any and all Basel events, as long as you keep it local!

LOCAL VS GLOBAL

Our weekend was crazy. Friday’s festivities started with Dylan Hall’s E.P. Release Party and ended with INVT’s set at Little Spaiti. Saturday got us way too tired, football during the day and another local party at night. What better way to wrap up the litness than with a blog? Are we right…

Well, whatever you think you’re still reading. We’ll take it as a yes. The weekend brought an important point to all our eyes. By all we mean the UMAMI crew. After seeing multiple amazing performances from local talent, we realized we need to cover an issue that stands in the way of UMAMI, locals, and a lot of listeners, whether you listen to music on the daily or on the boat throughout the weekend.

What to listen to. It sounds simple but it isn’t. When we turn on the radio or we use the outdated but still very popular Pandora you get the hits. Billboard hits, radio hits, mainstream hits, all types of hits. Now imagine you’re in the car. You’re on your way to school in the morning and it’s a Monday. Fuck we hate Mondays.

Anyways, your on your way and you’re listening to music. If you aren’t, we’re sorry to say that you’re lame. What are you listening to? For most, hits. Again, hits on the radio or hits that Spotify and Apple Music want you to listen to. Is it bad? We’re not the biggest fans but no, it isn’t. Close to all Americans listen to them.

After the story there’s always a point. Our point is that A LOT of people listen to hits. Now our question: How many people listen to locals?

We got to give credit to Dylan Hall and his amazing performance to finish off an amazing event. After he rapped his last phrase, he made a speech in which he gave thanks to friends, family, his crew and said “I listen to locals on the daily”. We do too. That doesn’t make it amazing. The way he said it, the way he went about it really stuck to us. The people that were in the room listening to him felt his sincerity, his realness for the local community, and the want for locals to be heard. All in all, it taught us a lesson that even though we’re listening to locals, we’re also listening to the Migos, Travis Scott, Diplo, Flatbush Zombies and too many more. How do we find a balance between our city and the world?

Since we started with music let’s keep using music as an example. If you’re starting to catch onto our drift (and have hopefully dived into the deepness of our blogs) you’ll notice that this can be for any art form anywhere. Where does a person find the balance between giving to the local community while giving to the world? At what point does the artist give him/herself freedom to go outside of the local community? As a listener and observer, who should we listen to? Who should we support?

All of you won’t like our answer but we think it’s the truth. Listen, support, watch, learn from who you want to learn from. Yes, we support locals to the max but we’re all humans, you’re attracted to what you like. Someone who doesn’t appreciate FOOM! shouldn’t have to support them because they’re local. On the contrast, someone who loves FOOM! shouldn’t feel forced to enjoy the radio. We’re all different, we all like different things and, us included, have locals we aren’t real fans of.

Appreciate locals but you don’t have to love them. Support the people you think are amazing, not the ones your friend is always listening to. Do the extra step and immerse yourself in Youtube, IG, or any other platform. Find those people you like, even if they aren’t only locals. From a creatives perspective, we cherish 10 committed supporters more than a 100 bots. Keep it real Miami, not only for the creatives, but for you.

#SUPPORTLOCALS

PAPERWATER: Boundaries Don't Exist

Eclectic. Different. New. Three words to summarize Paperwater. As you’ve heard before, Paperwater is a duo comprised of Eddy Samy and Daygee Kwia. Instead of speaking about their background, which you can read below (you will never guess where Daygee is from) we’re going to spend a little time talking about what music means to them. The reason? Well, because Insomniac and Grungecake both wrote great articles/interviews about them. Why do it again?

We’re using Insomniac’s last paragraph: “To Eddy and Daygee, music does not belong in a box, neatly labeled and filed away under the appropriate Beatport genre tab. To Paperwater, music is universal and constantly evolving. Like them, it should be allowed to test limits and change perspectives.” Agreed. Look throughout history and tell us we’re wrong! Music has changed continuously since it’s creation due to many factors, mainly related to the intermingling of cultures still happening today. Paperwater and us are on the same wave about this, music was never meant to have boundaries and never should (unless you’re Justin Bieber and you have to make mainstream hits to stay afloat).

Let’s take it a step further. Both Eddy and Daygee believe that music has no boundaries and through meeting them, we think they have no boundaries. VENTURE 2018 featured all types of artists with no boundaries. YOMY, INVT, Chester Watson, these guys are slowly changing the Miami music scene, one song at a time. Paperwater and Coffintexts had a back to back set of bumps. They played some hits and narrowed most of their set down to songs you’ve never heard of. We’ll make sure to record our next event so we have proof (video doesn't do it justice).

The point is that they’re well aware of what’s happening in the music scene, I mean, you could hear it. On Grungecake’s interview upon being asked “How has Miami shaped your sound/influences?” in 2015, Daygee responded “It hasn’t at all. We fuck with other artists here, but not the city. It shows no love to it’s children.” Fuck we love these guys. Even though we sweat and bleed Miami, I understand the point. The question is: Is that only Miami, or the whole USA?

Paperwater has taken their “no boundaries” attitude towards films, music videos, interviews, blogs (shoutout to them for taking the time to do what we’re doing), and even guides, like their 2017 Art Basel Guide on their website www.halffullagency.com. Their passion towards creativity has taken them to Europe, across the US and too many places to name. Plain and simple, these guys are setting new boundaries of art that’s being appreciated everywhere. Follow their agency @halffullcreative, click the follow button on their social media tag @paperwater, and take a second to check them out, they’re changing Miami (even though it’s not their favorite place) for the better.

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INVT

INVT=Innovate. The meaning of innovate is to create something new. New doesn’t mean never created before. It can be pieces put together to make a new product, it can be a different sound with the same beat or fuck us, it can be a new car. Creating something new takes skill, talent, and the right mindset. INVT has all that and more.

If you haven’t heard of INVT, you better go listen to our playlist “INVT: The Collective”! Their a duo compromised of Luca Medici and Delbert Perez (we’ll stick to Luca and Delbert). Both born and raised in the 305, they’re locals. Performing at our last show, VENTURE 2018, and as part of the UMAMI fam, we’re showcasing them this week. It’s the week before Halloween, might as well get spooky.

Luca and Delbert both started playing music in their youth (orchestra, jazz band, metal bands, all that good stuff). Connecting over skateboards, they became besties and started to produce. Short but sweet, INVT was born.

INVT has grown a lot in their recent years. More then talking about their past, both went to NYC for college (producing) and have recently returned to Miami for a gap year, we want to talk about INVT itself. What makes it special? Why do they do it? Believe it or not, it’s similar to UMAMI’s vision. Let’s get into it.

In our opinion, INVT’s a multi-disciplinary art project. They produce and play music, have their own clothing brand, AND make films as well as cover art. Two people doing all that? We know. They’re going for it. On top of that they’re creating a culture. INVT is meant to be a local, real brand that they’re shaping everyday. Check out their website and you’ll see what we mean.

Seeing where they’ve come, we know these two are putting in work every minute of every day to bring their brand to life. Their music, as well as everything they do is exactly what they call it, innovate. It’s different, new, and it’s Miami with a twist. Let’s call it the new “underground Miami”. It has that down to Earth real Miami- MSG gang type shit- with that tropical coconut and palm tree vibe. The biggest shocker of them all is that these guys are barely legal!

The future looks mighty bright for the one and only INVT. They’re finding a new sector in Miami’s music scene thats going away from the norm. We’re motivated by what they’re doing, we respect, and fully support their movement. You should too.

FOLLOW @INVT305 AND @UMAMIMUSIC305 ON IG, FB, TWITTER, ALL THAT BULLSHIT.

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Events Are Different.

Events are made for people to come together, interact, and converse. People go to clubs and enjoy a couple (or more) drinks followed by dancing and the occasional hook-up. It’s nothing more than letting go, having a good time and for most, “relaxing”. The event world is a whole lot different. In the 21st century, there’s events for just about any specialty good on the market. Vegan festivals, potato festivals, yoga/meditation festivals to name a few. Events have a purpose that’s developed to cater to a certain market, in-turn bringing in a certain “crowd” of people. UMAMI accepts all crowds of people and makes it easy for people to share ideas. The philosophy I go by is as follows: Good vibes bring good everything. If we, as UMAMI, share positive ideas, values and generally maintain a good attitude towards any situation, we attract the same.

UMAMI’s presence was solidified with a statement an attendee made at the last event. He said, and I quote, “You’re making a community outta a (out of a to be classy) pile of individuals”. Miami has been known to be exclusive. Coming into the community, being part of it and contributing to it isn’t easy.

Through art, good vibes and creatives, we’re bringing together people that should’ve been together long ago. We’re using art as a medium for social inclusion, development and awareness for all types of social/global issues on a local and global scale, one thing this country definitely could benefit from.  

INVT @ VENTURE 2018! Shot by @apexvisuals. Background to our now infamous website :)

INVT @ VENTURE 2018! Shot by @apexvisuals. Background to our now infamous website :)

*Written by Dries Darrow, creative director and owner of UMAMI.*

Ultra has an Ultra problem

Ultra Music Festival. Should we stop there? Nah, you’re right. Ultra’s globally recognized as a powerhouse event company. We can’t say Ultra Music Festival and quit. It’s like foreplay that doesn't end in a happy ending, another word for it, blue balls.

To understand Ultra, we need to go back almost two decades ago. Holy fuck I’m two decades old! Anyways, on March, 1999, 7,000 people gathered in Miami Beach’s Collins Park (runs from 17th-25th street) to hear headliners Rabbit in the Moon and Union Jack. 50 performers, $30 tickets, it started with a rave.

The first Ultra was a success (kinda). It’s reported that co-founders Russell Faibisch, a Beach native, and Alex Omes, an Argentine who moved to the Beach during childhood, lost $10-20,000. Putting that into perspective to what Ultra’s become, it’s pennies.

Years go by and Ultra only grows. Working alongside Miami Music Conference (MMC), Ultra became the closer of the week-long conference to eventually be the main festival of MMC. From there, the sky was the limit. Ultra now hosts 20+ music festivals a year in 20 countries. If that isn’t amazing we don’t know what is.

Along the road to success Ultra had its bumps. Its natural for any event company, only thing Ultra had going against it is Miami. It’s people, the government, and the awful traffic.

Let’s start with the people. We just mentioned co-founders Russell and Alex. There’s a story about these big boys that goes way deeper than Ultra. 2010, 11 years after starting Ultra, Russell and Alex had a falling out. Alex was ousted from the organization and it was up to Russell to take over. This is when it gets super interesting. While locked in a years-long legal battle with his former business partner, Omes died in his sleep the day before his lawsuit against the festival was set to go to trial. Miami New Times later reported he had drugs in his system, though the autopsy was not conclusive. Bamn. Just blew your mind right quick.

We can talk more about the drug arrests, trampled security guards and the infamous “girl kissing a tree” vid you can find here. It’s all relevant to how Ultra came to be but we understand, “time is money”.

Today is what we need to address. Ultra has had continuous and prosperous growth in Miami dependent on the continued support of locals and Miami’s finest government services. That continued support ended many years ago, each year scaring Ultra to pick substitute venues (just in case). The time has come that Ultra might really need to have alternatives.

The day of VENTURE 2018, Miami commissioners rejected an agreement made between Ultra and the City of Miami. Carollo, the commissioner who chairs the agency that manages Bayfront Park (for this case the big shot), continually denies any proposals made by still CEO Russell Faibisch. His worries are the same of residents. Traffic, loud music, drugs, and safety, all important issues Ultra needs to figure out. The fact is: If Ultra doesn’t come back with an agreement commissioners will sign, well, they’re fucked.

Ultra’s in a pickle that everyone knows about. What’s their next move? Well at UMAMI we know what we would do. Get as many of those commissioners to say yes to Ultra. Let’s be realistic: Ultra brings an economic incentive to Miami, it keeps the culture of electronic dance music alive and it serves as a ritual to almost any local who knows Miami for what it is, the magic city.

Since we’re here anyways, if Ultra has to move, where would it be? The Everglades? Hard Rock Stadium (Rolling Loud Part 2)? Homestead-Miami Speedway? No matter what, Ultra will be here March 29-31st. For fucks sake, tickets already sold. Comment below.

Curious to know more? Click on  LOCALS ONLY  and we’ll take you through an interactive journey.

Curious to know more? Click on LOCALS ONLY and we’ll take you through an interactive journey.

VENTURE 2018

September 24th, 2018 + 4 = September 28th, 2018 = VENTURE. Yes that’s right, VENTURE 2018 is 4 days away. Here’s the all you need to know about VENTURE (and extra’s):

  • Community Rules: VENTURE is taking place at Naomi’s Garden, Restaurant, and Lounge. It’s been around since the 1980’s, first being part food cart/food truck to finally settle permanently in Miami, FL. The community around is different to say the least. It’s mostly Haitian since Little Haiti is in close vicinity (technically not in Little Haiti), but carries all types of people. We’ve been multiple times to plan, and I can say that it’s the “real deal” Miami (to say the least).

  • Sacred Space: Chatting with the owner last week, he said that the garden has a purpose. Not shi*, right? Well the purpose isn’t to be a garden. It’s a safe space. For the community around and Miami as a whole, the owner believes we need more places for people to relax, eat some delicious food, and have conversations over tinder swipes ;)

  • Friends: 8 people work for Naomi’s. 4 in the restaurant, one cleaning, one fixing and two owners. Why are there always more people working? It’s called volunteering. The community loves Naomi’s so much that there’s multiple people stopping by throughout the day to help. Whether that’s cleaning a palm tree or fixing the pond, Naomi’s is there’s and it’s there to stay. 

  • Chester, Paperwater, INVT, Coffintexts, YOMY, Dylan Hall, what’s going on?!?: It’s time for an explanation. We sandwiched Chester Watson, a North Miami rapper and producer, alongside electronic artists and rapper, Dylan Hall. Why? We’re reinterpreting the local music scene to what we see it to be. Miami is full of every type of music in almost every genre. Having each event being a certain genre, even though we do center around a certain sound (Electronic/Hip-Hop for this one), would do Miami injustice. VENTURE is to try new things and experiment so……. why not?

  • Vending ain’t easy: 5 amazing vendors are gearing up to rep the 305 for VENTURE. We’ll have the flyer dropping tomorrow on all social media’s. If you haven’t kept track, we’ve posted the full flyer (with addition of YOMY) and artist collective. Damn I almost forgot about our collective….

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For you guys who’ve had a lazy weekend (don’t worry we understand) and haven’t checked our

IG (https://www.instagram.com/umamimusic305/)

FB (https://www.facebook.com/umamimusic305/)  

Twitter (https://www.twitter.com/umamimusic305/)

Here’s our full flyer: 

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VENTURE needs only the essentials: local wardrobe, local bag, you know what, local everything.

Have a great week and we’ll see you Friday!             

Locals are life

What's up fam! It's been a hectic week. CONNECT, take-down, and getting ourselves out of sleep deprivation to planning our next event. Let's just say we're staying busy. 

Through the chaos, we keep being asked "UMAMI, what keeps you going?". Let's talk about what keeps the train from derailing. 

We love people. No, not you, you fucking tourists, we love people who are local. 305, 786, 954, that's us. Bringing together locals, helping locals, and seeing the work pay off makes what we do worth it. We don't care about money. Money isn't important right now. We're young, we're motivated for change and, to us, change is everything. Changing perceptions, opening up locals eyes to more than the Miami traffic and hot weather, it's a movement for embetterment. 

CONNECT saw many new faces, most of whom we had no idea would show. INVT, Chaoscanine, Pagoda Media, Rollingbliss fest and Miami New Times to name a few. We're blessed to have such influential and great figures already supporting our goal. Their similarity? Locals. Every single one of our 300+ attendees were Miami driven, either raised or living in. Bringing together these creative, innovative and multi-talented people who before our event, had no idea who the other was. THAT is what we do it for.

"Why though, UMAMI? Like, why, like, do we have to bring together locals?" - Attendee at CONNECT. Thanks attendee from CONNECT! Your single question just put us on a hunt for reasoning. Don't get me wrong, we know why, it's just great to hear the question that brings it all together. 

Bringing together locals is like making a soup. Yes, you can make a chicken soup with broth, chicken and some vegetables. But, a real chicken soup is more. Noodles, spices, herbs, salt and pepper. The best soup has it all. 

Miami is already a bitching good soup. I mean, we already got those little Jewish dumplings in there. What we're lacking is a great community to display this beautiful soup in. The amount of talented artists and musicians in Miami is gargantuant. We would go as far as to say that the pure talent outweighs Los Angeles. The biggest difference between the two? Los Angeles has the outlets for young creatives, Miami doesn't. 

UMAMI is an outlet for creatives, a place for locals to interact and, a beautifully directed and seasoned chicken soup. We're doing it for local talent, for Miami to be known for what we already have yet lack to show, and for Miamians to have a great night, realizing the artistry that surrounds them. The underground will rise out of UMAMI like the Phoenix rising out of the ashes.

Till next time.

Note from the Author: I brought up money for multiple reasons. Miami lives on money. Think about it, talk to locals and find out for yourself. If you're living in Miami, the first, or one of the first topics of conversation is, and will hopefully not be in the near future, your paycheck. It's sad to say that money determines what people think of you, their life choice and for UMAMI, their plans to slide to our next show. If you're reading this, I know I'll see you soon!

 

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The most influential chef in the world.

I hate death. I don't think about it and I definitely don't look forward to it. Sadly, it's part of this thing we call "life". For some it comes early and for others, it comes way too late. I believe that life should be enjoyed until you can't anymore. Once I hit pain, please kill me. I'm not trying to have machines keeping me alive. My heart keeps me alive and if it gives up, I give up too. 

You know we always talk about Miami. That's what this blog is for: Have an open dialogue about Miami, it's people, how we communicate, why we communicate and how we can make it better (together!). I've steered off into different directions when I think it's necessary. Today, it's a new level of necessary. If we don't talk about this man, his achievements and how he changed the culinary world, we would be kidding ourselves. 

Anthony Bourdain, also known as Tony. If you haven't heard, he committed suicide last night in a hotel room in Strasbourg, France. Strasbourg is part of the North East province, right on the border of Germany. Once I saw the news, I  got goosebumps. As I'm writing this I'm getting goosebumps. Tony changed my life. His book, Kitchen Confidential, as well as his show "Parts Unknown" were instrumental in who I am today. He showed me the world as it is, in his eyes. I couldn't be more grateful. 

Tony did great things. I'm not going to bore you with his background too much.  He grew up in shitty circumstances. Struggling to get by, Tony turned to drugs. Heroin, cocaine, and a bunch of alcohol used to be his driving force. It's obviously not the best mix. Did it lead to his death? It might've, but one can argue that it made him the man he was. His life experiences, which there are countless of, made him see things in a new light. Especially food.

In his 61 years of living, Bourdain wrote and was part of 45 books, had multiple tv shows as well as working in over 20 restaurants. If that doesn't impress you, what will?

More than being a celebrity chef,  Tony brought together the world. His attitude towards food and people were like non-other. His willingness to try new things, experiment and do whatever the fuck he had to for the people were like non-other. Tony shouldn't be remembered as a chef, he's an ambassador of food, culture, and people. He realized the influence of food in culture and  was the first, in my opinion, to use it to unite the world. Something so powerful that we owe the culinary scene in Miami, and abroad, to him. Rest in peace you beautiful fucking maniac. 

Editor's Note: Tony's suicide is tragic. He's one of hundreds of thousands committing suicide each year (even though each case is different). The US has seen suicide rates increase by 25% over nearly two decades. Twenty-five states have experienced a rise in suicides by more than 30%. Not only is this worrying, it tells us something about our society. Are the suicide rates as high in Europe? Asia? South America? We need to think about this. Guns are killing people and have become a huge national debate. Why isn't mental health? Mental health is killing people. We can't blame mental health on individuals. It's a disease we all deal with, even though we don't admit it. 

*How to get help: In the US, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255. The International Association for Suicide Prevention and Befrienders Worldwide also can provide contact information for crisis centers around the world.*

 

 

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UUUUUMMMMMAAAAAMMMMMMMIIIIIII WAKEY WAKEY

It's been another rough night. Hung out with the "homies" a little too long, watched some Netflix after and you know, did what I did. Before doing anything really, I look at my phone to see all types of texts, Instagram likes and whatever. Fuck that. I just woke up. I go to iTunes (if I'm feeling risky Spotify or Soundcloud) and play my favorite song. It changes weekly, but this week it's between Motorcycle Patches and Glass Flows. I'll let you guys look up the artists so I don't ruin the surprise. 

After listening I'm already under the shower. Music makes me get out of bed. But why? Is my brain behind it? Do these songs have lyrics that make me hyped? Are the beats making my hips move and shake? Does the sound give me energy? As I always say, good question!

I don't care about the science behind it, I'm telling you what I think. Science isn't interesting, it doesn't include fuck and bass and locals.  My hypothesis (you're welcome you scientists out there): Music wakes me up, specifically my brain and to me, turns it on. It gives me ideas and tells my brain, this is what we need to do and we have this time to do it. Lets get it done. 

For everyone its different. My point is that music drives my creativity and passion. It wakes me up and keeps me up. If it wasn't for music, I definitely wouldn't get out of my queen size Ikea (too bad its not a king).

P.S. What gets you up every morning? C'mon, there's got to be something. We don't just get out of our Ikea, extra soft beds without a valid reason. We let you in on ours. Lets hear yours. Comment section below..

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Is this art...

Art, according to Oxford Dictionaries, is "the expression or application of human creative skill and imagination, typically in a visual form such as painting or sculpture, producing works to be appreciated primarily for their beauty or emotional power". 

Thanks for the intro Oxford, I couldn't think of anything. Since who knows how long ago (actually), art has been a dominant part of ones culture. We have always had this innate ability to create. Well, maybe not innate if it was necessity but ya know what I mean.

At first, it was fire. Even though it doesn't use a brush or camera, it's people collaborating to make something new, making it, to UMAMI, an art form. From there, art has developed to include sculptures, painting, photographs, videos and so much more. What I want to talk about is the "so much more".

As the Piccasso's as we'll call them took the world by storm, people developed the idea that artists paint, take pictures, or sculpt. Art, for that matter, is seen by the majority of our public as visual. What we forget about is the other forms , some which have only been around in the 21st century. 

My favorite example is food. Food is an art form! What chefs create in the kitchen makes them artists. Ok, most of you are probably thinking that I'm out of my mind. I see your point, but try to see mine. What's the difference between painting a mural and creating a beautiful plate of food? Both take creativity, long hours of hard work, imagination and perfection. What a chef does in the kitchen, how he prepares the food and ultimately presents it makes him an artist. 

A more recent example is technology. Computer programmers and application developers are all artists. They work on making new apps, better forms of communication, and write new codes to make technology (hopefully) easier to use. You might not think of these "geeks" as artists but their underlying passion lies in creating new. What makes them different then a painter starting on a fresh canvas? Besides that they're using computers of course!

Artists are everywhere and anywhere. Being an artist doesn't technically make you a visual artist. Quite the contrary, calling yourself an artist can be for close to anything (especially today). I'm an artist because I play bass, my close friend is an artist for designing clothes, my cousin is an artist for DJing, my dad is an artist for being a scientist and creating new, better public health initiatives and my aunt is an artist for writing. This list can go on and on, but I'm getting hungry and I'm going out to dinner. These artists better create some fire!

 

 

305 TILL I DIE!!!!

Ah yes, the old saying 305 till I die. First used by Pitbull, we’ve all used it at some point, either as a joke or in some type of conversation. It means simply, Miami till I fuckin die. Being born in Miami, raised in Miami or living in Miami, we’re lucky to encounter all walks of life, different cultures, different communities and different opinions. Even though we don’t agree on much, we all love Miami. That, and we all call it home. 

305 till I die is a saying that makes Miami’s community. We don’t agree (besides on traffic and tourists), we stick up a lot of middle fingers and we’re pretty fucking selfish, but we all have respect for the city. Yes, many of us say we want to leave and that we’re fed up with it, but are we actually? Miami always has people coming back. Something about the great weather, beautiful girls and our favorite, locals, keeps people around. What keeps you in Miami?