Filtering by Tag: iiipoints

III POINTS, WE LOVE YOU

Hey fam! Happy February. It’s weird to say that we’ve been busy but what can we say? We always are. Today marks the day that we’re on another grind: get these fucking events going! Why? Well we’ve been held back by venue owners, speaker rentals, partners, and all that stuff ya’ll don’t need to worry about. What we all need to worry about is iii Points, not only an inspiring festival full of creative and most importantly, local people, but a festival that this year, did it all.

We were lucky enough to attend all 3 days of 3 points (see what we did there). Friday’s headliner was Tyler, Saturday Beach House and Herbie Hancock, Sunday was full of legends: Erykah Badu, Egyptian Lover, A$AP Rocky, Danny Daze, David August, DJ Koze, lets stop there before we take up a whole page. It was a musical masterpiece to say the least. Our experience, which is what we want (and can talk about), is heaven (if there is one, of course).

The day before iii Points was a stressful one for one main reason: weed. We needed it. Once we settled that we focused on our schedule, made conveniently using the iii Points app. Just for reference, the two essentials to iii Points are weed and schedule. The rest’ll be history.

Moving forward to something more educational, our first day (and last) were an absolute blast. We posted our full schedule on IG for Friday. Mostly house and techno music, we focused on the isotropic and boiler room stage. The main stage, called Mind Melt, was shaking with Tyler and a special appearance from the man himself, A$AP motherfucking Rocky. Crazy. That’s that.

Saturday and Sunday were a lot of the same. House, techno, house, hip-hop, bands and to add to the mosh posh: Valentine’s Day weekend. iii Points, in its decor and music, made love a vocal point. For crying out loud, we left Herbie early to go to Masego. If you weren’t at his set and you didn’t feel the love, well, you had to. It was really a joy and eye-opener.

Summaries sound boring. All in all, boring. In conclusion, yawn. Let’s go with “a heavenly weekend”. From music choice to stage design, sound, lighting, vendors, merchandise, venue, and even security, we can safely say iii Points did an amazing job. If you’re convinced on going to iii Points already, you can stop here. You have the 2020 vision that Ms. Badu (and the poet who introduced her) stated. For those of you who need more info, details, a little kick in the ass to get to Mana next year, here’s our breakdown on what they did well, how they did things different, and why iii Points is different than anything else.

  • Music: We read an article in which co-founder David Sinopoli said “we want 50% local, 50% big names”. He explained the idea behind it: Put someone on stage who brings a large crowd (meaning big name) right before or after a local act. By doing so, you're attracting a larger audience, most who’ve never heard the local act, to interact and listen to locals. Genius. Line-up was on point by the way.

  • Stage: iii Points 2019 had a couple of major revamps: different date and a lot more stages. Six stages made up the festival this year spanning all of Mana Wynwood. Isotropic was our favorite with Door IV being the lesser of the great. Our opinion: keep making stages original and stop being modern. We don’t want the black stages with curtains, we want something new and creative. Just like iii Points is.

  • Vendors: Throughout the festival there were art instillations, food vendors, clothes, bars, buses, and even a little market called Little Spati. A little birdy told us the food was programmed by someone different this year. Even though we don’t know who it is, job well done. The food was delicious. Clothing stand and the extras were cool, but our eyes were set on the weed maps bus. Not only a dope idea, but a useful one.

  • Merch: Cool. Very cool. Wanted to buy a long sleeve but they closed before we could make it. Made us think of a system that attendees should be able to buy before and pick up later. That way we can all party and deal with business in the morning.

  • Venue and Vibe: The two v’s go together, don’t they? Mana Wynwood is conveniently located and has been/still is the perfect place for iii Points. Storage containers, wooden structures, lights, and a disco ball only made Mana shine “brighter than a diamond”.

  • Security: We know you guys don’t really care about security but you’ll care about this, iii Points doesn’t give a shit about weed. Put it in your pocket gentlemen, you don’t have to tuck and go for this one.

A festival comes down to being together with people, listening to amazing music, and having a memorable time. We can say that iii Points needs to work on having less technical difficulties, time management skills, and nitpick points of improvement but, for this festival, it isn’t worth it. All the artists showed up, nothing really went wrong, and everyone had a great time. iii Points, we have the 2020 vision, we love you, and can’t wait to be doing what your doing <3

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Ultra, Rolling Loud, iii Points: You're all the same.

Yup, we said it. The biggest music festivals in Miami are all, let’s say it again, the same. Genre? Ok, that’s different but we aren’t talking genres, we’re talking big picture. Date? Yes, that’s valid and venues, those are different too. What we’re talking about today is pricing, accessibility, and goal.

Ultra, Rolling Loud, and III Points (2019) ALL have price points over $300. I don’t care where or when you bought the ticket, there’s no way you payed less. To be honest, most of us payed more (if you’re lucky enough to go). To make the math quick, it’s $100 a day. Add drinks, food, weed, and all the extras you’re looking at $150.

We love to say that “we’re rich” in Miami, right? That we can afford anything? Try going to one of these festivals and tell us that you aren’t hurting after. We won’t believe you. No matter how much $150 is to you, $150 is A LOT of money for one day of fun. Yes, you get to see all these great acts that separately would’ve been $50 a pop. We understand that. But, and there’s always a but, these festivals have the ability, first of all, to make it cheaper. On top of that, they’re using the same venue for multiple days (meaning better pricing). You start thinking about that and well, you get upset. Just like we are.

To understand our frustration we have to look back at what makes music (and music festivals) so great. Music festivals started with the idea of bringing people together, plain and simple. It didn’t matter where you came from, what you did, what you were outside of the festival what mattered is that you were there to share a moment with people you knew, love, or if you didn’t know any, to share a moment with everyone (sorry for the run on sentence, we got excited).

From being a public gathering, we’d make the claim that music festivals have gone private. Staying in the 305, Rolling Loud has become the largest hip-hop music festival in the world. This year marks their five year anniversary. What has changed between year one and five? Price. Five years ago at Mana you could get a ticket for $50! Now we’re looking at $400 (with no single day tickets available). Ok, ok. The festival is three days, the names are huge and the venue/times have changed. Cool. I feel you Tariq. Our question remains: Why so expensive? Why aren’t their opportunities for underprivileged individuals to go? Why aren’t their volunteer positions? Internships? Anything?

For us it comes down to accessibility. Music festivals like Ultra, Rolling Loud, and III Points have the ability to change individuals lives. Their power is across all social media outlets, locally and globally. They need to take advantage of what they have, respect the culture of music festivals, and understand, ultimately, what music is. We’re not in the 1990’s in which blacks and whites couldn’t be in the same arena. Today, we have the ability to bring all peoples together and learn, connect, and grow. Our problem with music festivals and the world is something so simple yet complex: Why can’t we be the same? Why do certain people get to experience things others can’t? And, finally, why can’t we help each other, at least locally, grow?

UMAMI’s here to bring back the reason music festivals began. Woodstock and Monterey Pop Festival, to name a few, started a legacy of what we now know as “music festivals”. We aren’t bringing back Woodstock, it’s the mantra that we’re looking for. It’s not about the money (to a certain extent), it’s not about materialism, it’s about bringing people together for the love of music, plain and simple.

* We have to say that we’re lucky enough to attend all three festivals and support the culture to the most. Yes, all three can improve but so can we! We all can. *

* We have to say that we’re lucky enough to attend all three festivals and support the culture to the most. Yes, all three can improve but so can we! We all can. *