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Miami Music Week

It’s that time of year again! Pool parties, boat parties, 24 hour bangers, and just about everything in between. We’re excited to kick off this week by telling you about our plans, from start to finish. Here’s our 2019 MMW schedule:

  • Monday, March 25th: Strange Bass WMC Edition - Fully diving into the early 90's rave scene & DIY culture, this edition of Strange Bass will feature a variety of genres from some of South Florida's most talented musicians. *

  • Tuesday, March 26th: Onur Ozer, Taimur & Desyn by Un_Mute & The Selectors - After the amazing Detroit Love boat party on Tuesday afternoon of MMW we are heading over to The Electric Pickle to continue with master selectors Onur Ozer, Taimur, and Desyn for whats to be the last conference of the best sounding room in Miami.

  • Wednesday, March 27th: PRISMA Artists MMW Showcase by Link Miami Rebels - Prisma Artists is having their first ever showcase on the globe and they have chosen Floyd Miami to be the birthplace of it all! Their roster is slammed with talented musicians across the electronic spectrum. This lineup they've brewed for Miami shows the firepower this crew has to offer.

  • Thursday, March 28th: Detroit Love feat Carl Craig, Stacey Pullen, and Matthew Dear - After-hours @ The Hangar (2:30-9 AM).

  • Friday, March 29th: Lucid WMC/MMW - 3rd annual Lucid Rave and pajama party presented by Internet Friends, Untitled Miami, and Late for Work. Locals on locals on locals on locals. Villain Theater, 11-4 AM. $5 w/ RSVP, $10 @ door. *

  • Saturday, March 30th: Space Invaders presents Saturday MMW 2019 - Saturday night of MMW Link Miami Rebels will be hosting a massive night, morning, and afternoon where all rooms at Club Space will be open to dance and explore.

  • Sunday, March 31st: MMW 24hr Closing Party - Sunday, March 31st we will be closing off another monster MMW week with our biggest party yet! You do not want to miss this one, the line up is literally unreal!

    For those of you who aren’t interested in exploring the club scene, here’s a list of FREE events throughout MMW: Guide to Free Miami Music Week 2019 Parties.

    Finally, here are a couple events that don’t go into the deep night:

  • Thursday, March 28th: Sunset Sessions with Dave Sol & Friends, 5-10 PM, The Standard. Free w/ RSVP. *

  • Friday, March 29th: Colada Sunrise featuring bbq, spirits, and a bunch of local DJ’s. 10am-7pm, North Shore Open Space Park. FREE! *

We aren’t putting multiple events a day (since there are hundreds) because we, like you, don’t want to be overwhelmed. Take Monday and Tuesday off (if you need it), come Wednesday and we’re going full party mode! Have a great MMW and remember to drink water, eat food, and c’mon: take care of yourself!

Love from the UMAMI Crew.

P.S. Everything with a * does not require ID ;)

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The 2 Live Crew

We said it was the last blog of 2018 but you know what, we lied. After scrolling through all the social media’s, we got inspired. The place we ended up? Miami Bass, also known as booty music.

If ya’ll know anything about Miami’s music history you know about Miami Bass. It started in the 80’s with producers and hip-hop artists alike, searching for a “real” 305 sound. The story goes something like this:

It was 1985 when Miami based producer Amos Larkins II discovered the TR Roland 808. While he was mastering the track that would become the first ever Miami bass track, ‘Bass Rock Express’ by MC ADE, he was having a little fun (well, if you’re into drugs and strippers, a lot of fun) that distracted him just enough to make a brilliant mistake.

After partying in a local strip club - the party location of choice in Miami before South Beach became what it is today - downing a lot of liquor, smoking some weed, and doing a bunch of coke, he felt loose enough to go to the studio and do the final engineering on the track before sending it off to press. In fact, he felt so loose that he decided to bring one of the strippers with him; A decision that would obviously lead to a distracted effort but inadvertently lead to genius.

Working on the bassline with the volume lower than usual so he could focus on the sex and drugs, he recorded a track that he would have never sent off otherwise. When he heard the final product at his friends mixtape store he freaked out. In an interview with the Miami New Times, he told them how the bass “was hittin' hard and fucked up and out of phase and it was all over-compressed and shit” even noting that it was “was humming like bass from hell”.

He probably would have had a cocaine/stress induced heart attack had he not immediately been relieved by the fact that the whole store was grooving to the track -- and they weren’t the only ones. He left the store and heard it bumping from the speakers of a car that was slowly driving by in the parking lot. He was shocked. Waiving them down, he asked if they were into the song and its new sound and they basically said “Hell yeah!”.

That brings us to 2 live crew, one of the most (or the most) influential hip-hop groups reigning from the east coast. They took the Miami Bass to a whole new level, adding dirty lyrics to the already dirty beats. Let us remind you that this was the 80’s. Marvin Gaye’s “Sexual Healing” was already considered a provocative tune, what do you think the country thought of 2 live crew’s “Throw the D”? Yup, you guessed it, the old guys didn’t like it.

2 live crew, including the “pack leader” Luther Campbell, were summoned to the US Supreme Court. Faced with a monumental decision to stop making music or fight the oldies, they decided to fight the oldies (good decision). As always, the oldies lost, not getting their wish to ban 2 live’s music. From then on (and still today), they paved the way for musicians everywhere to embrace their raunchy side.

Thanks to the boys, your favorite rappers can say all the fucks and motherfuckers and bitches and assholes they can think of. Censorship can suck our dick and the oldies can too. Thanks for letting us share a little history and we’ll see you next year. For real this time ;)

A camera is a rappers best friend

In today’s culture, online presence seems to transcend the music itself. I'm sure we’ve all been there: scrolling through our Instagram feed when suddenly you scroll past an obviously paid promotion for a poorly written and recorded rap song, that sounds exactly like some other rapper you already know. Just 3 seconds into listening you can hear the keyboards typing “free playboi carti type beat” on the YouTube search bar.

Not to be mean but why is it that so many new rappers are coming out nowadays? Sure the “SoundCloud” wave has revolutionized how the industry works, making it easier for new artists to be noticed, but it seems to be the ones, with the better online presence that survive and prosper. Music Videos, Instagram, Face Tattoos, Fake Chains and WordStar hashtags. Rappers nowadays value their online image more than the lyrical content itself.

Ok, look, I'm guilty. I enjoy rappers like Lil Pump, Playboi Carti, and 6ix9nine. You’re gonna tell me you don’t absolutely lose your shit when a song like GUMMO, D-rose or Magnolia comes on? These songs are perfect examples of what I call concert anthems. Songs that have a very reparative flow/hook making them ideal songs to mosh at a concert. There’s one other thing that ties these songs specifically together, music videos.

Lil Pump’s network clocks in at around 6.5 million dollars. Yes, you read that right. At the age of 17, he’s worth more than my whole family, combined. Now we could talk all day about how Lil pump is a lyrical genius (sarcasm guys…it’s the best) but we must agree that one of the main things that launched him into stardom was his persona. At 16 years old Pump was making waves in the underground rap scene for being a kid with tattoos and pointing a rifle in his mouth (in the music video for Ski Mask). Lil Pump was practically the poster child for the phrase “WTF”. Today, my mom knows who Lil Pump is and she’s never heard a word of his music.  Yet she recognizes his name and face. Pink dreads, tattoos, white but trying to be black, people know him for his look, his style, all thanks to the modern age. 

Social media is, and I would say continues to be the ammo that fuels the gun of Sound cloud and online rapping.  Example; Just Juice...that can mean one of two things. Either it’s just juice, or it’s a musical artist. Just juice became famous for his Instagram videos of freestyling and looking like Action Bronson’s step kid. There are so many artists now that use Instagram as their main source of promotion and media outlet. 

So, we know having a social media is the first step. But what sets you above the rest? What takes a 17-year-old kid with pink dreads to the cover of the XXL freshmen magazine the next year? Music Videos. For a videographer like myself, the name Cole Bennett carries A LOT of weight. Cole Bennett, in my opinion, is responsible for the launching of so many rap careers this year. Examples include Lil skies, Famous Dex, Lil Xan, Juice Wrld, Ski mask the Slump God. The list goes on and on.

Because of music videos and this great thing, we call Youtube, a rapper can establish, or further establish an online presence. Music videos give you a different look into an artist’s song. It gives you something to visually picture every time you hear the song. It puts you, and the rapper, out there. A music video has the potential to push your music career forward…a good music video that is. A good videographer is a rapper’s best friend. A camera, is a videographer’s best friend…so in other words …lets be friends.

MVNGO

Miami through music

Music tells a story. It tells the listener where the artist is from, why the artist made the music, when the music was made, the culture behind the music and the style the artist associates it with. Through a song, we can identify who the artist is, or at least make a good guess to his/her upbringing. 

What I find most interesting about music is it's cultural aspect. Culture is defined as "the ideas, customs, and social behaviour of a particular people or society." Through music, we can identify someone's culture, meaning where and what they grew up around. 

UMAMI's playlist, which we release every other Monday, is the definition of associating music with culture. Our goal is to identify the best artists in a certain community/city and put their music in a playlist. This playlist is found on iTunes, Spotify, and Soundcloud, in which the links are posted under the "Playlist" tab. 

Why is this important? We want to share Miami through music. By listening to music from each city in Miami Dade-County, we not only realize the amazing artists that either grew up or live/lived there, we understand that cities culture. With over 30 cities in Dade-County (36 if you wanna be exact), there's a hell of a lot of culture to understand (and make playlists for). 

To give you an example, we started our playlist idea with a place that has "talent that rivals any other neighborhood in the world", Carol City. Carol City is a neighborhood in Miami Gardens, known for importing crime and drugs to all of Dade-County. What we found, besides the obvious Carol City High School that brought together notable rappers such as Denzel Curry, Twelve'len and just about everyone, is the huge amount of rap "all stars" that came from this infamous drug community. I'm talking real all stars, not no TMZ bullshit. I'll put these guys up there with Eminem, Dr.Dre, Tupac and Biggie type deal. Rick Ross, Gunplay and SmokeGhostPurrp. If you haven't heard of these guys you need to crawl out of that rock you're living under and check out Carol City X UMAMI!

Digging just a little deeper, we wanted to know why this violent community made such great rappers. Listening to the rappers, their lyrics revolve around the crime they're associated with. Why did they start rapping? They were making money, doing what most to everyone does in poverty, sell drugs and just about anything else for money. Why would you go to making music, which has no guarantee for making money or success?

Bingo! I know why. Remember Carol City High School? Good. It's where all these amazing artists went to. Living in Carol City, the environment or the "hood" as Denzel Curry says it, makes amazing musicians. Since I haven't lived in Carol City, let me let the expert, Denzel Curry, take a swing at the question: 

What is it about the neighborhood that's led to so many musical artists?
I just think it's the environment. All of us went to Carol City High. Even Flo Rida went there. I think just by the programs that were there and the activities, and the outside activities, the hoods and everything—it just really made the people what they are today. - Vice.

Through music, we can understand so much about a city that we don't even have to visit it (even though we highly encourage it!). Go check out our playlist Carol City x UMAMI and let us know what you think, what we could/should change and if you feel you now understand one of the biggest melting pots in our county. 

*If you're interested in learning more about Carol City and it's rappers, Twelve'len recently released a great video with Red Bull entitled "Definition of a Florida Boy". Enjoy!*

                                                                                              Cover Art by Victoria Frank. 

                                                                                              Cover Art by Victoria Frank. 

Two hands is better than one

Hola amigos(as)!! 

Hope we've all had a great summer. Ours has been mostly work. Ok, fine. You got me. We've had a party here and there, but its mostly work. 

Before we get into it, I want to hear about your experiences this summer. Has summer 2018 been as great as you wanted it to be? We've been scrolling through those Instagram (IG) stories and some of you, I'm not gonna put you on the spot, look like you're having a blast. Comment and tell us what has been the best part of your summer! We want to know. 

Me and the crew have been as busy as ever. We're proud to say that UMAMI music is expanding to include a customized playlist, Youtube channel and the infamous Twitter. God I hope we get to tweet with President (or lack thereof) Trump. 

Throughout our journey, we've learned many, many things. One of the first lessons, which I'm sharing today with everyone, is that "teamwork makes the dreamwork". Yes, its corny as fuck, but its also the truth. Having a team to help you create your dream, in whatever field that might be, is as smart as apple pie.

I'm not here to bore you with a greater good lesson about how teamwork makes everything more feasible. That's for school. I'm here to share my personal experience on running UMAMI in the Magic City, the city that never sleeps, the 305, the orange capital of the US, Miami. 

Miami has two underlying factors that go into everything. Money and connections. Luckily for us, we have private investors that make the first one easy. The latter is a little more complicated. 

Being 3 months old, we aren't a household name (yet). Locals have no idea of what we stand for, what we hope to do and what we, ultimately, will do. As we expand, that'll change. This is where we're  having fun. Expanding and working together with people who share the same common goal. For us, that's UMAMI. Me, on my own can't reach the same people my crew can. I don't know how to design like my crew can, I can't make videos like my crew, sound, lighting, stage design, bla bla bla. Without them, I can't do much. Without me, they can't do much. With each other, we can do anything.

For my fellow creatives out there, I want you to turn off your "do it yourself" blinders and think about it. Whether you're an artist, musician, writer, dancer, actor, businessman/woman or anything in between, stop trying to do it all. I learned this the hard way. The fact is: you can't. 

Surround yourself with people who see your goal, look further then today and your idea that "what I think is best". Yes, it might be the best to you, but is it the best for your work, for your company, for your future? Find people who are experts in their field who can help you create. Miami is full of selfish bastards who don't stop cutting me off no matter what time it is, but there's also those great, amazingly talented motherfuckers who see the beauty in what you're doing!

Fuck I'm getting deep. My point stands, finding people to help you might not be the easiest, but it gives the best outcome. I love my crew and I thank them each day for their contribution to UMAMI. 

*If you wish to help out and be part of the crew, go to our "team" tab. If there's nothing there that tingles your senses, contact us through the contact form. There's all types of ways you can join the UMAMI Wave!*

Locals are life

What's up fam! It's been a hectic week. CONNECT, take-down, and getting ourselves out of sleep deprivation to planning our next event. Let's just say we're staying busy. 

Through the chaos, we keep being asked "UMAMI, what keeps you going?". Let's talk about what keeps the train from derailing. 

We love people. No, not you, you fucking tourists, we love people who are local. 305, 786, 954, that's us. Bringing together locals, helping locals, and seeing the work pay off makes what we do worth it. We don't care about money. Money isn't important right now. We're young, we're motivated for change and, to us, change is everything. Changing perceptions, opening up locals eyes to more than the Miami traffic and hot weather, it's a movement for embetterment. 

CONNECT saw many new faces, most of whom we had no idea would show. INVT, Chaoscanine, Pagoda Media, Rollingbliss fest and Miami New Times to name a few. We're blessed to have such influential and great figures already supporting our goal. Their similarity? Locals. Every single one of our 300+ attendees were Miami driven, either raised or living in. Bringing together these creative, innovative and multi-talented people who before our event, had no idea who the other was. THAT is what we do it for.

"Why though, UMAMI? Like, why, like, do we have to bring together locals?" - Attendee at CONNECT. Thanks attendee from CONNECT! Your single question just put us on a hunt for reasoning. Don't get me wrong, we know why, it's just great to hear the question that brings it all together. 

Bringing together locals is like making a soup. Yes, you can make a chicken soup with broth, chicken and some vegetables. But, a real chicken soup is more. Noodles, spices, herbs, salt and pepper. The best soup has it all. 

Miami is already a bitching good soup. I mean, we already got those little Jewish dumplings in there. What we're lacking is a great community to display this beautiful soup in. The amount of talented artists and musicians in Miami is gargantuant. We would go as far as to say that the pure talent outweighs Los Angeles. The biggest difference between the two? Los Angeles has the outlets for young creatives, Miami doesn't. 

UMAMI is an outlet for creatives, a place for locals to interact and, a beautifully directed and seasoned chicken soup. We're doing it for local talent, for Miami to be known for what we already have yet lack to show, and for Miamians to have a great night, realizing the artistry that surrounds them. The underground will rise out of UMAMI like the Phoenix rising out of the ashes.

Till next time.

Note from the Author: I brought up money for multiple reasons. Miami lives on money. Think about it, talk to locals and find out for yourself. If you're living in Miami, the first, or one of the first topics of conversation is, and will hopefully not be in the near future, your paycheck. It's sad to say that money determines what people think of you, their life choice and for UMAMI, their plans to slide to our next show. If you're reading this, I know I'll see you soon!

 

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CONNECT

Good morning, afternoon, and evening. I'm not sure which one it is. Time gets confusing. 

We've been working hard (or hardly working) for our first event July 6th. Our flyer has been released, we're twenty minutes from releasing the time table and things are looking a okay. Time to write a blog.

CONNECT was named connect for a reason. We don't do things just to do them. Actually, we do but that's mostly when we're either bored, fucked up, or something in between. Sorry mom and dad, its the way it is.

Connect is the basic idea of bringing together two things. You connect with people, with communities and, on the other hand, you disconnect from your phone when having sex. Well at least if you have a good sex life you do!

We thought of connect after multiple hours of brain storming. Connecting to my wifi, we realized the perfect name was right in front of us. Connect. It's our mission statement, our goal, and what we're doing all of this for. To connect people, locals and communities. Yes, we're doing it for the 305 but that's just the beginning. Cities across FL, the US, and the world need UMAMI to connect.

CONNECT is July 6th. We're bringing together the best of local creatives. I like to say creatives because it encompasses everyone. Anyone who starts a business, either as an artist, musician or entrepreneur has creativity. It's not all about having the best business strategy, knowing people, or the money to do so, its about having a creative idea and going through with it. Going through with it is a feat in its own that should be celebrated by all. 

Our flyer is under the "Events" tab. We hope to see everyone in the 305 there. To party, first of all, and, secondly, almost as important as the first, to connect.